Run Postman scripts on Jenkins with Docker

You can run Postman scripts from the command line with Newman, but if you want to run these scripts as part of your Continuous Integration environment, you can run it with Docker or directly on Jenkins.  In case you prefer to use Docker, you can get started by downloading the Jenkins Docker instance and changing the Dockerfile to include node using the following node installation code found in the Docker/Jenkins Repository:

# Install Node

RUN curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_4.x | bash

RUN apt-get -y install nodejs

RUN node -v

RUN npm -v

RUN npm install -g newman

Then, you will need to rebuild the Docker image and start the container with the same instructions as in the Jenkins Docker Repository.

You should now have a fully working Jenkins instance installed locally. Great! Now back to the task at hand using the newly-installed instance of Jenkins:

  • Create a new “Freestyle” job in Jenkins.

You will set it up to be able to upload the collection as a parameter. When you do this with your own projects, you should commit the Postman collection into whatever repository you’re using and pull directly from that repository to build by selecting “this project is parametrized” and then choosing “Add Parameter” with a “File Parameter.”

 

  • Select two file uploads – one for the collection and one for the environment.

  • Add a post-build step with “Execute Shell”. You’ll use the same command you used to run it from your own command line earlier (If you are using the same OS) except your path should be collection.js, as you named it ‘newman run collection.json’ in the File Parameter name field.

 

  • Now test it and run the build. I just uploaded the collection.json since I’m not using the environment file yet, but you can add it to the command line with:
    newman run collection.json –e environment.json

 

If you want to use the built in JUnit Jenkins viewer, you can archive the XML test result and point the tests to it. Below there is a sample of how you might archive and use the JUnit test results.

Screen Shot 2018-09-01 at 07.30.50Screen Shot 2018-09-01 at 07.30.40

 

 

Resources: https://www.qasymphony.com/blog/automated-api-testing-tutorial/

API tests with newman and postman

 

API is the most important part of your software because it has the highest security risks. What if someone were to hack your API? They could get production data, they could Bitcoin ransom the servers or they could hide on the machine until something interesting happens. The bottom line is, the stakes when using an API are much higher than if there is just a bug in the UI of your application — your data could be at risk and, by proxy, all of your users’ data.

API testing is not only the most vital testing to be done against your application, but it is also the easiest and quickest to execute

With your API tests and having a Continuous integration process, you can:

  • Test all of your endpoints no matter where they are hosted
  • Quickly ensure all of your services are running as expected
  • Confirm that all of your endpoints are secured from unauthorized AND unauthenticated users

 

Postman

Download postman for free

Now you need to have an API to test, you can select one from any-api or qa-symphony for this tutorial. In this example we are going to use this Oxford Dictionaries. Now on postman, you can create a collection and start to feed with your tests. Also, you can create an environment with environment variables and also global variables that can be used across the requests, for example a token.

 

Login with Token on Postman

  • Click on Manage Environments

 

  • Set the host

  • Type the request URL, change the host to the variable {{host}}
  • Select POST request and type the headers

 

  • Type the Body with the credentials for your site.

 

  • Open the Tests tab and write the tests to validate the request and set the access_token as an environment variable. You will need to use this variable in the header of all of your next requests.

var jsonData = JSON.parse(responseBody);

tests["Status code is 200"] = responseCode.code === 200;
tests["Access Token is not blank"] = jsonData.access_token !== "";
tests["Message success"] = jsonData.scope.indexOf("success") !== -1;

postman.setEnvironmentVariable ("access_token", jsonData.access_token);

 

  • Hit Send and if the status code is 200, it means the credentials are correct. Save the request in your collection.

 

  • Now you can create all the other requests and tests needed, just remember to add the {{access_token}} in your header and save the requests in your collection

 

 

Running your API automated tests

  • Now that you have a collection with all your tests, click on Runner and select your collection, environment. Type the number of interactions and delays in case you want to simulate more than multiple interactions.

  • You can also import a CSV file with data and substitute for variables in the body or header of the request.

 

  • The results report will be like this one:

 

Newman

 

To run your tests from the command line you need to have Newman, open your terminal and run npm install -g newman

  • Export your collection from Postman (Collection_v2) and download your environment (go to “Manage Environments” and click the download button) from Postman

 

  • Open your terminal an type the command to run the API tests: newman run /local/path_to_your_postman_collection.json

 

  • The result will be something like this:

 

  • To run the script on Jenkins you need to add the parameters  –reporters junit,json and the results should be created under a folder called “Newman” in your working directory, so: newman run -reporters junit,json /local/path_to_your_postman_collection.json

 

Resources: https://www.qasymphony.com/blog/automated-api-testing-tutorial/

https://api.qasymphony.com/#/login/postAccessToken